DJ fingers turning knobs on a mixer

Do I need a DJ website?

 

Yes. Simple as that. And if you don’t have one now you’re being seen less and less. Forget Soundcloud, Mixcloud, Facebook, RA and everything else - you don’t control those spaces, they are places you create content for and the platform benefits from as you promote them via your content. YouTube remains the only real platform that pays you to create content, whilst Facebook wants you to pay for the people who follow you to see the content you created - when you look at it like that, that’s madness!

 

What are the benefits of having a website?

 

First and foremost is having one central place for your fans and followers to go and check out and a place for Google to index in search, increasing your ability to attract new users to your online home.

 

It doesn’t mean you stop creating content on social platforms, it just means you want to direct traffic to your site for that mix, for that blog post, or to read that interview you did. Promoting it on socials is still needed, but it’s about bringing users to you - your online space - that’s important.

 

Your marketable skills in theory should be based on your talent and your sound, but the fact is people judge your professionalism on everything they find online - so making that first encounter true to the image you want to project is key. If you think about your DJ idols, I bet they have a sorted brand image.

 

Your own website also means you can build your own community of fans, add forums, do special content for the people that actively support you - the possibilities are endless.

 

What should I have on my DJ website?

 

Being able to control that space is huge. You can design it to reflect your brand image - structure the site around the things people want from a DJ website. Including your Electronic Press Kit, Contact details, rates, bookings etc. You can also embed Facebook, Soundcloud, YouTube, Spotify and the rest - although probably not all of them! And obviously have links to your social media channels for the super fans who want to follow you everywhere.

 

The best DJ websites are well organised. It doesn’t have to be a huge site, and using a Squarespace, WordPress, or Wix template is perfectly good. The homepage should introduce you and set the tone for the type of music/brand you have. Give people a flavour of the site content but keep it simple - and think mobile first!

 

Your ‘About’ section should tell people what you do and where you play - don’t bore them with an essay on how you first heard music and all that crap - no one cares! Make sure you note any big achievements, gigs, people you’ve played alongside here.

 

If you’re a DJ/producer you can introduce users to this right here - if that’s you then I think you should be thinking about clearly splitting the two up on the site, so if I’m after a DJ I can find that info easily, but if I want to know about your releases, labels, remixers etc then that should have it’s own page I’d say (at least).

 

Here’s a quick list of essentials:

 

Logo

Biography

Electronic Press Kit

Mix player embedded/Youtube player

Contact info/form

Bookings list (where people can go hear you)

Social media links

 

Why is a DJ website important?

 

Your DJ website will (in time) help you land bigger gigs and allow you to showcase your personality far more than a Facebook page allows and given so many DJ’s just don’t put their time and effort into creating one, it will stand you apart from the masses.

 

 

More like this

DJ fingers turning knobs on a mixer
DJ fingers turning knobs on a mixer

Do I need a DJ website?

 

Yes. Simple as that. And if you don’t have one now you’re being seen less and less. Forget Soundcloud, Mixcloud, Facebook, RA and everything else - you don’t control those spaces, they are places you create content for and the platform benefits from as you promote them via your content. YouTube remains the only real platform that pays you to create content, whilst Facebook wants you to pay for the people who follow you to see the content you created - when you look at it like that, that’s madness!

 

What are the benefits of having a website?

 

First and foremost is having one central place for your fans and followers to go and check out and a place for Google to index in search, increasing your ability to attract new users to your online home.

 

It doesn’t mean you stop creating content on social platforms, it just means you want to direct traffic to your site for that mix, for that blog post, or to read that interview you did. Promoting it on socials is still needed, but it’s about bringing users to you - your online space - that’s important.

 

Your marketable skills in theory should be based on your talent and your sound, but the fact is people judge your professionalism on everything they find online - so making that first encounter true to the image you want to project is key. If you think about your DJ idols, I bet they have a sorted brand image.

 

Your own website also means you can build your own community of fans, add forums, do special content for the people that actively support you - the possibilities are endless.

 

What should I have on my DJ website?

 

Being able to control that space is huge. You can design it to reflect your brand image - structure the site around the things people want from a DJ website. Including your Electronic Press Kit, Contact details, rates, bookings etc. You can also embed Facebook, Soundcloud, YouTube, Spotify and the rest - although probably not all of them! And obviously have links to your social media channels for the super fans who want to follow you everywhere.

 

The best DJ websites are well organised. It doesn’t have to be a huge site, and using a Squarespace, WordPress, or Wix template is perfectly good. The homepage should introduce you and set the tone for the type of music/brand you have. Give people a flavour of the site content but keep it simple - and think mobile first!

 

Your ‘About’ section should tell people what you do and where you play - don’t bore them with an essay on how you first heard music and all that crap - no one cares! Make sure you note any big achievements, gigs, people you’ve played alongside here.

 

If you’re a DJ/producer you can introduce users to this right here - if that’s you then I think you should be thinking about clearly splitting the two up on the site, so if I’m after a DJ I can find that info easily, but if I want to know about your releases, labels, remixers etc then that should have it’s own page I’d say (at least).

 

Here’s a quick list of essentials:

 

Logo

Biography

Electronic Press Kit

Mix player embedded/Youtube player

Contact info/form

Bookings list (where people can go hear you)

Social media links

 

Why is a DJ website important?

 

Your DJ website will (in time) help you land bigger gigs and allow you to showcase your personality far more than a Facebook page allows and given so many DJ’s just don’t put their time and effort into creating one, it will stand you apart from the masses.

 

 

DJ fingers turning knobs on a mixer
DJ fingers turning knobs on a mixer

Do I need a DJ website?

 

Yes. Simple as that. And if you don’t have one now you’re being seen less and less. Forget Soundcloud, Mixcloud, Facebook, RA and everything else - you don’t control those spaces, they are places you create content for and the platform benefits from as you promote them via your content. YouTube remains the only real platform that pays you to create content, whilst Facebook wants you to pay for the people who follow you to see the content you created - when you look at it like that, that’s madness!

 

What are the benefits of having a website?

 

First and foremost is having one central place for your fans and followers to go and check out and a place for Google to index in search, increasing your ability to attract new users to your online home.

 

It doesn’t mean you stop creating content on social platforms, it just means you want to direct traffic to your site for that mix, for that blog post, or to read that interview you did. Promoting it on socials is still needed, but it’s about bringing users to you - your online space - that’s important.

 

Your marketable skills in theory should be based on your talent and your sound, but the fact is people judge your professionalism on everything they find online - so making that first encounter true to the image you want to project is key. If you think about your DJ idols, I bet they have a sorted brand image.

 

Your own website also means you can build your own community of fans, add forums, do special content for the people that actively support you - the possibilities are endless.

 

What should I have on my DJ website?

 

Being able to control that space is huge. You can design it to reflect your brand image - structure the site around the things people want from a DJ website. Including your Electronic Press Kit, Contact details, rates, bookings etc. You can also embed Facebook, Soundcloud, YouTube, Spotify and the rest - although probably not all of them! And obviously have links to your social media channels for the super fans who want to follow you everywhere.

 

The best DJ websites are well organised. It doesn’t have to be a huge site, and using a Squarespace, WordPress, or Wix template is perfectly good. The homepage should introduce you and set the tone for the type of music/brand you have. Give people a flavour of the site content but keep it simple - and think mobile first!

 

Your ‘About’ section should tell people what you do and where you play - don’t bore them with an essay on how you first heard music and all that crap - no one cares! Make sure you note any big achievements, gigs, people you’ve played alongside here.

 

If you’re a DJ/producer you can introduce users to this right here - if that’s you then I think you should be thinking about clearly splitting the two up on the site, so if I’m after a DJ I can find that info easily, but if I want to know about your releases, labels, remixers etc then that should have it’s own page I’d say (at least).

 

Here’s a quick list of essentials:

 

Logo

Biography

Electronic Press Kit

Mix player embedded/Youtube player

Contact info/form

Bookings list (where people can go hear you)

Social media links

 

Why is a DJ website important?

 

Your DJ website will (in time) help you land bigger gigs and allow you to showcase your personality far more than a Facebook page allows and given so many DJ’s just don’t put their time and effort into creating one, it will stand you apart from the masses.