Close up of vinyl record sleeves lines up in a row with a pair of headphones

How to get press coverage

 

Whether you’re an artist or record label getting press coverage is key to getting noticed and heard. How to get more of it, and most importantly how to get better coverage is something we all strive for. Traditionally you just had to contact magazines and radio stations with a release and build from there, but as technology has broadened and audiences splintered the need to have a cohesive approach, across traditional and new media channels is ever more vital.

 

In an age of sharing, cut and paste and users being found across multi-channels it’s easy to mistake quantity for quality. In truth, it’s a fine balance. Be seen and heard, but not overly flood the space. As channels change the metrics of who sees what I follow a theory that frequency is important given users won’t always be there, or see what you post.

 

Exclusivity and premiers

However, increasingly larger blogs and magazines are looking for exclusive content, to attract audiences to them and with content you can’t get anywhere else. These channels typically work on a 4 to 6 week in advance plan.

 

So, be organised - have your promotional plan in place and approach them with plenty of time for them to respond and organise things with you in that timeframe. More and more blogs are now offering paid promotion too - especially on Soundcloud or Spotify playlists with lots of followers. What’s important here is you ask the right questions and consider how much you can/want to pay for the exposure.

 

If you’re supply video content, be sure you know the formats needed, and make it high quality.

 

Reviews

Back in the days of DMC Update and a more print biased info reviews of the release and a score we’re the holy-grail. These are rarer these days, but still an awesome way to get noticed. These days most review sites come with an audio clip or stream, so you’ll need to be organised for that in advance of release. These channels could be working 6 to 8 weeks in advance - meaning you need to on this in conjunction with the label or in support of them.

 

Spotify Playlists

There’s basically two types of these. User generated and the Editorial ones. Getting on the Spotify selected ones is based on plays and popularity, unless you have a good relationship with someone at Spotify or you have PR person to push that for you. That means you need to make an impact on release (Spotify unlike Beaport, Traxsource and co doesn’t do pre-release streams).

 

Find out who is behind the playlists you follow, the one’s your music suits, build a relationship with them and on release ask if they’ll include it. Maybe a promo copy of the release will smooth the way for that? Reach out to all your contacts with playlists - you want your tune in there so the system sees your track is going off and they add you to the Editorial playlists!

 

Building your artist profile

While we’re on Spotify, this is why an Artists Profile is so important. This group of followers will get the Release Radar email, see your new release and hopefully play it, add it to their playlists and add to the tide of popularity you need to reach the Editorial lists.

 

Artist features and interviews

Blogs and websites are always hungry for content. Some will create it themselves, others even pay people and some just look for prewritten content to post. Again, the exclusivity of a feature counts here, so if you think that’s something you’d be up for doing select the outlet for it carefully - you want maximum impact for your hard work. Be sure to supply everything they’ll need; images, copy, audio, retail/streaming links - the idea is to make it so simple to post they do it.

 

I’m a big fan of interviews, I think they can better get a sense of the artist and you get a chance to ask questions that might spark something interesting in the conversation. On the UM Deep House Blog that also gives me the opportunity to add links to the end to related articles - linking readers to more content on the subject.

 

Instagram Followers

This one isn’t something I’ve even looked at, but I believe there’s lots of ‘influencer’ profiles out there that will post your content for payment. Personally I think Instagram is more of a brand building channel, and not so much of a sales channel (basing this on the frequency of click throughs from links posted on my own profile to the website).

 

That said, if you see this an a channel to build your profile then this could be a good way to develop an audience of your own - using your music to get noticed.

 

Facebook Groups

Posting in relevant Facebook Groups can be a good way to get heard. Better still is getting the Admins of the group to post for you. This is all about relationship and being an active part of the group. So get active, like and comment on others posts. Be noticed then see if the Admins will help share the music/links/posts.

 

Podcasts

And finally the Podcast. Being features, having your track played, doing a guest mix or doing a show takeover are all great ways to get coverage and be heard. Chances are you listen to the sort of podcasts you want to be on. So think about what you can being to the radio show. As you’ll know I love a guest mix on my own UM - Deep House Podcast, and the stats show listeners do too. And through my High 5ives weekly show I cover releases from that week only - interestingly no one has ever approached me about getting on that show so far in an effort to have a co-ordinated promotional campaign, but I’m sure someone will after this article! Ha!

 

Summary

The important things regardless of how you are approaching getting press coverage for your release is to be organised. Have content and assets ready for the outlet to use without too much effort, if any.

 

Consider what mix of things is best for you. Trying to be seen and heard on every platform, everywhere at the same time is not possible unless you’re a huge name or label. Target places you can build a relationship with, be ready to offer exclusive content, give them a reason to want it - and never, ever cheat by sending it to other places too - you’ll get found out and getting heard again will be near impossible.

 

And importantly, what you want to get out of it. If you’re looking to build a following on Spotify then make that the primary link you’re pushing to people. If you’re wanting to sell music be sure that’s the focus and don’t confuse it with links to every social media platform.

 

Be humble, be polite and respect people’s choice to not use your content or promote your music - every platform has it’s own goals for the content they create or share - just because yours didn’t make it this time doesn’t mean it won’t in the future. So, you want to be remembered as being professional for the next time!

 

More like this

Close up of vinyl record sleeves lines up in a row with a pair of headphones
Close up of vinyl record sleeves lines up in a row with a pair of headphones

How to get press coverage

 

Whether you’re an artist or record label getting press coverage is key to getting noticed and heard. How to get more of it, and most importantly how to get better coverage is something we all strive for. Traditionally you just had to contact magazines and radio stations with a release and build from there, but as technology has broadened and audiences splintered the need to have a cohesive approach, across traditional and new media channels is ever more vital.

 

In an age of sharing, cut and paste and users being found across multi-channels it’s easy to mistake quantity for quality. In truth, it’s a fine balance. Be seen and heard, but not overly flood the space. As channels change the metrics of who sees what I follow a theory that frequency is important given users won’t always be there, or see what you post.

 

Exclusivity and premiers

However, increasingly larger blogs and magazines are looking for exclusive content, to attract audiences to them and with content you can’t get anywhere else. These channels typically work on a 4 to 6 week in advance plan.

 

So, be organised - have your promotional plan in place and approach them with plenty of time for them to respond and organise things with you in that timeframe. More and more blogs are now offering paid promotion too - especially on Soundcloud or Spotify playlists with lots of followers. What’s important here is you ask the right questions and consider how much you can/want to pay for the exposure.

 

If you’re supply video content, be sure you know the formats needed, and make it high quality.

 

Reviews

Back in the days of DMC Update and a more print biased info reviews of the release and a score we’re the holy-grail. These are rarer these days, but still an awesome way to get noticed. These days most review sites come with an audio clip or stream, so you’ll need to be organised for that in advance of release. These channels could be working 6 to 8 weeks in advance - meaning you need to on this in conjunction with the label or in support of them.

 

Spotify Playlists

There’s basically two types of these. User generated and the Editorial ones. Getting on the Spotify selected ones is based on plays and popularity, unless you have a good relationship with someone at Spotify or you have PR person to push that for you. That means you need to make an impact on release (Spotify unlike Beaport, Traxsource and co doesn’t do pre-release streams).

 

Find out who is behind the playlists you follow, the one’s your music suits, build a relationship with them and on release ask if they’ll include it. Maybe a promo copy of the release will smooth the way for that? Reach out to all your contacts with playlists - you want your tune in there so the system sees your track is going off and they add you to the Editorial playlists!

 

Building your artist profile

While we’re on Spotify, this is why an Artists Profile is so important. This group of followers will get the Release Radar email, see your new release and hopefully play it, add it to their playlists and add to the tide of popularity you need to reach the Editorial lists.

 

Artist features and interviews

Blogs and websites are always hungry for content. Some will create it themselves, others even pay people and some just look for prewritten content to post. Again, the exclusivity of a feature counts here, so if you think that’s something you’d be up for doing select the outlet for it carefully - you want maximum impact for your hard work. Be sure to supply everything they’ll need; images, copy, audio, retail/streaming links - the idea is to make it so simple to post they do it.

 

I’m a big fan of interviews, I think they can better get a sense of the artist and you get a chance to ask questions that might spark something interesting in the conversation. On the UM Deep House Blog that also gives me the opportunity to add links to the end to related articles - linking readers to more content on the subject.

 

Instagram Followers

This one isn’t something I’ve even looked at, but I believe there’s lots of ‘influencer’ profiles out there that will post your content for payment. Personally I think Instagram is more of a brand building channel, and not so much of a sales channel (basing this on the frequency of click throughs from links posted on my own profile to the website).

 

That said, if you see this an a channel to build your profile then this could be a good way to develop an audience of your own - using your music to get noticed.

 

Facebook Groups

Posting in relevant Facebook Groups can be a good way to get heard. Better still is getting the Admins of the group to post for you. This is all about relationship and being an active part of the group. So get active, like and comment on others posts. Be noticed then see if the Admins will help share the music/links/posts.

 

Podcasts

And finally the Podcast. Being features, having your track played, doing a guest mix or doing a show takeover are all great ways to get coverage and be heard. Chances are you listen to the sort of podcasts you want to be on. So think about what you can being to the radio show. As you’ll know I love a guest mix on my own UM - Deep House Podcast, and the stats show listeners do too. And through my High 5ives weekly show I cover releases from that week only - interestingly no one has ever approached me about getting on that show so far in an effort to have a co-ordinated promotional campaign, but I’m sure someone will after this article! Ha!

 

Summary

The important things regardless of how you are approaching getting press coverage for your release is to be organised. Have content and assets ready for the outlet to use without too much effort, if any.

 

Consider what mix of things is best for you. Trying to be seen and heard on every platform, everywhere at the same time is not possible unless you’re a huge name or label. Target places you can build a relationship with, be ready to offer exclusive content, give them a reason to want it - and never, ever cheat by sending it to other places too - you’ll get found out and getting heard again will be near impossible.

 

And importantly, what you want to get out of it. If you’re looking to build a following on Spotify then make that the primary link you’re pushing to people. If you’re wanting to sell music be sure that’s the focus and don’t confuse it with links to every social media platform.

 

Be humble, be polite and respect people’s choice to not use your content or promote your music - every platform has it’s own goals for the content they create or share - just because yours didn’t make it this time doesn’t mean it won’t in the future. So, you want to be remembered as being professional for the next time!

 

Close up of vinyl record sleeves lines up in a row with a pair of headphones
Close up of vinyl record sleeves lines up in a row with a pair of headphones

How to get press coverage

 

Whether you’re an artist or record label getting press coverage is key to getting noticed and heard. How to get more of it, and most importantly how to get better coverage is something we all strive for. Traditionally you just had to contact magazines and radio stations with a release and build from there, but as technology has broadened and audiences splintered the need to have a cohesive approach, across traditional and new media channels is ever more vital.

 

In an age of sharing, cut and paste and users being found across multi-channels it’s easy to mistake quantity for quality. In truth, it’s a fine balance. Be seen and heard, but not overly flood the space. As channels change the metrics of who sees what I follow a theory that frequency is important given users won’t always be there, or see what you post.

 

Exclusivity and premiers

However, increasingly larger blogs and magazines are looking for exclusive content, to attract audiences to them and with content you can’t get anywhere else. These channels typically work on a 4 to 6 week in advance plan.

 

So, be organised - have your promotional plan in place and approach them with plenty of time for them to respond and organise things with you in that timeframe. More and more blogs are now offering paid promotion too - especially on Soundcloud or Spotify playlists with lots of followers. What’s important here is you ask the right questions and consider how much you can/want to pay for the exposure.

 

If you’re supply video content, be sure you know the formats needed, and make it high quality.

 

Reviews

Back in the days of DMC Update and a more print biased info reviews of the release and a score we’re the holy-grail. These are rarer these days, but still an awesome way to get noticed. These days most review sites come with an audio clip or stream, so you’ll need to be organised for that in advance of release. These channels could be working 6 to 8 weeks in advance - meaning you need to on this in conjunction with the label or in support of them.

 

Spotify Playlists

There’s basically two types of these. User generated and the Editorial ones. Getting on the Spotify selected ones is based on plays and popularity, unless you have a good relationship with someone at Spotify or you have PR person to push that for you. That means you need to make an impact on release (Spotify unlike Beaport, Traxsource and co doesn’t do pre-release streams).

 

Find out who is behind the playlists you follow, the one’s your music suits, build a relationship with them and on release ask if they’ll include it. Maybe a promo copy of the release will smooth the way for that? Reach out to all your contacts with playlists - you want your tune in there so the system sees your track is going off and they add you to the Editorial playlists!

 

Building your artist profile

While we’re on Spotify, this is why an Artists Profile is so important. This group of followers will get the Release Radar email, see your new release and hopefully play it, add it to their playlists and add to the tide of popularity you need to reach the Editorial lists.

 

Artist features and interviews

Blogs and websites are always hungry for content. Some will create it themselves, others even pay people and some just look for prewritten content to post. Again, the exclusivity of a feature counts here, so if you think that’s something you’d be up for doing select the outlet for it carefully - you want maximum impact for your hard work. Be sure to supply everything they’ll need; images, copy, audio, retail/streaming links - the idea is to make it so simple to post they do it.

 

I’m a big fan of interviews, I think they can better get a sense of the artist and you get a chance to ask questions that might spark something interesting in the conversation. On the UM Deep House Blog that also gives me the opportunity to add links to the end to related articles - linking readers to more content on the subject.

 

Instagram Followers

This one isn’t something I’ve even looked at, but I believe there’s lots of ‘influencer’ profiles out there that will post your content for payment. Personally I think Instagram is more of a brand building channel, and not so much of a sales channel (basing this on the frequency of click throughs from links posted on my own profile to the website).

 

That said, if you see this an a channel to build your profile then this could be a good way to develop an audience of your own - using your music to get noticed.

 

Facebook Groups

Posting in relevant Facebook Groups can be a good way to get heard. Better still is getting the Admins of the group to post for you. This is all about relationship and being an active part of the group. So get active, like and comment on others posts. Be noticed then see if the Admins will help share the music/links/posts.

 

Podcasts

And finally the Podcast. Being features, having your track played, doing a guest mix or doing a show takeover are all great ways to get coverage and be heard. Chances are you listen to the sort of podcasts you want to be on. So think about what you can being to the radio show. As you’ll know I love a guest mix on my own UM - Deep House Podcast, and the stats show listeners do too. And through my High 5ives weekly show I cover releases from that week only - interestingly no one has ever approached me about getting on that show so far in an effort to have a co-ordinated promotional campaign, but I’m sure someone will after this article! Ha!

 

Summary

The important things regardless of how you are approaching getting press coverage for your release is to be organised. Have content and assets ready for the outlet to use without too much effort, if any.

 

Consider what mix of things is best for you. Trying to be seen and heard on every platform, everywhere at the same time is not possible unless you’re a huge name or label. Target places you can build a relationship with, be ready to offer exclusive content, give them a reason to want it - and never, ever cheat by sending it to other places too - you’ll get found out and getting heard again will be near impossible.

 

And importantly, what you want to get out of it. If you’re looking to build a following on Spotify then make that the primary link you’re pushing to people. If you’re wanting to sell music be sure that’s the focus and don’t confuse it with links to every social media platform.

 

Be humble, be polite and respect people’s choice to not use your content or promote your music - every platform has it’s own goals for the content they create or share - just because yours didn’t make it this time doesn’t mean it won’t in the future. So, you want to be remembered as being professional for the next time!