What is an electronic press kit?

 

Your electronic press kit , often referred to as an EPK is your professional music resume that promoters, venue talent buyers, journalists and music industry people use to get the background on you, what you do, be the a DJ or producer, or label, understand what you bring to the table, and ultimately why they should be interested in working with you.

 

The EPK is your calling card, one of the key items in your promotional weaponry and a must have package these days for anyone wanting to be taken seriously in the music industry.

 

What should be included in an electronic press kit?

 

Your electronic press kit should always contain your biography and details about releases you’ve had, places you’ve DJ’d. Or whatever it is you’re promoting to people. It can also include press photos, videos, upcoming tour dates listings, booking information, contact details and any other marketing information.

 

Some key points to consider: decide what the goal of creating your EPK is - get bookings, get on a label, get press coverage etc.

 

How to structure your EPK

 

Biography

Write the content for the audience. For example - press may want to just copy and paste your biography into their feature, so writing it in the third person helps help, whereas if you’re trying to build a relationship for a residency or label deal then writing as if you’re speaking may be a better tactic.

 

Contact information

Make it as easy as possible for someone to contact you. Email, telephone number, WhatsApp info - whatever you can, the goal is to get them to contact you so help them do that.

 

Photography

This in itself is a huge topic. Essentially you need images that are professional, represent you and can be used in a lot of different ways. IF a website uses wide images, you’ll need landscape shots, whereas social media tends to be rectangle or square images - so have a range of images available in hi resolution too. I personally have a link out of my EPK PDF that takes people to a Dropbox folder with everything they might need in there - meaning people don’t have to download a massive file to get what they want.

 

Avoid cliches - DJ’s with headphones round their necks (really?) or carrying equipment (why?). Check out some of your peers or people you follow and respect and see how they’re doing it.

 

Social Links

These days people have so many - choose your most impactful social media platforms - probably the one’s where people can hear your sounds and make it clear what is what - not just a long list. Make it look well designed.

 

Website

If you have a website - get people to it - it’s a chance to tell a longer story and these days is a crucial part of your personal brand.

Booking info

Whether you have an agent or do all that yourself be upfront about things. Tell people where you’ve played or where you are booked in the coming months. When I was researching the interview with Rissa Garcia I downloaded her EPK and the last page was just her bookings for the coming months - it made a big impression - she’s busy, she must be great… it spoke volumes about her so make sure people know when and where you’re playing.

 

Releases

If you’re a producer, then I probably don’t need a full discography, but a best of list of releases or just the most recent few would be enough - maybe you’ve charted on one of the retail stores chart - if so include the info - it all helps show you are a successful producer and someone they should pay attention to.

 

How much does an electronic press kit cost?

 

It doesn’t have to cost you anything, call on mates, blag a good camera, make it yourself and you’ll keep the costs to a minimum or better still free. Google lists the costs as between $700 and $5,000 if you’re getting a designer in on things!!! If you want a designer get in touch, I’ll do it for way less than that - ha!

 

What to do with your EPK?

 

Now you have all the right stuff in your EPK, make sure you keep it up to date, spell check it, get someone else to read it for you too and then get it out there. A link on your website is a great place to put it. And, if you’re about to fire it out to everyone you have on your list, remember to take as much care over the email you’re sending as the EPK itself - you only get one chance to make a first impression, so make it count.

 

 

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Click here to subscribe to deep house mixes from $1 a month

What is an electronic press kit?

 

Your electronic press kit , often referred to as an EPK is your professional music resume that promoters, venue talent buyers, journalists and music industry people use to get the background on you, what you do, be the a DJ or producer, or label, understand what you bring to the table, and ultimately why they should be interested in working with you.

 

The EPK is your calling card, one of the key items in your promotional weaponry and a must have package these days for anyone wanting to be taken seriously in the music industry.

 

What should be included in an electronic press kit?

 

Your electronic press kit should always contain your biography and details about releases you’ve had, places you’ve DJ’d. Or whatever it is you’re promoting to people. It can also include press photos, videos, upcoming tour dates listings, booking information, contact details and any other marketing information.

 

Some key points to consider: decide what the goal of creating your EPK is - get bookings, get on a label, get press coverage etc.

 

How to structure your EPK

 

Biography

Write the content for the audience. For example - press may want to just copy and paste your biography into their feature, so writing it in the third person helps help, whereas if you’re trying to build a relationship for a residency or label deal then writing as if you’re speaking may be a better tactic.

 

Contact information

Make it as easy as possible for someone to contact you. Email, telephone number, WhatsApp info - whatever you can, the goal is to get them to contact you so help them do that.

 

Photography

This in itself is a huge topic. Essentially you need images that are professional, represent you and can be used in a lot of different ways. IF a website uses wide images, you’ll need landscape shots, whereas social media tends to be rectangle or square images - so have a range of images available in hi resolution too. I personally have a link out of my EPK PDF that takes people to a Dropbox folder with everything they might need in there - meaning people don’t have to download a massive file to get what they want.

 

Avoid cliches - DJ’s with headphones round their necks (really?) or carrying equipment (why?). Check out some of your peers or people you follow and respect and see how they’re doing it.

 

Social Links

These days people have so many - choose your most impactful social media platforms - probably the one’s where people can hear your sounds and make it clear what is what - not just a long list. Make it look well designed.

 

Website

If you have a website - get people to it - it’s a chance to tell a longer story and these days is a crucial part of your personal brand.

Booking info

Whether you have an agent or do all that yourself be upfront about things. Tell people where you’ve played or where you are booked in the coming months. When I was researching the interview with Rissa Garcia I downloaded her EPK and the last page was just her bookings for the coming months - it made a big impression - she’s busy, she must be great… it spoke volumes about her so make sure people know when and where you’re playing.

 

Releases

If you’re a producer, then I probably don’t need a full discography, but a best of list of releases or just the most recent few would be enough - maybe you’ve charted on one of the retail stores chart - if so include the info - it all helps show you are a successful producer and someone they should pay attention to.

 

How much does an electronic press kit cost?

 

It doesn’t have to cost you anything, call on mates, blag a good camera, make it yourself and you’ll keep the costs to a minimum or better still free. Google lists the costs as between $700 and $5,000 if you’re getting a designer in on things!!! If you want a designer get in touch, I’ll do it for way less than that - ha!

 

What to do with your EPK?

 

Now you have all the right stuff in your EPK, make sure you keep it up to date, spell check it, get someone else to read it for you too and then get it out there. A link on your website is a great place to put it. And, if you’re about to fire it out to everyone you have on your list, remember to take as much care over the email you’re sending as the EPK itself - you only get one chance to make a first impression, so make it count.

 

 

What is an electronic press kit?

 

Your electronic press kit , often referred to as an EPK is your professional music resume that promoters, venue talent buyers, journalists and music industry people use to get the background on you, what you do, be the a DJ or producer, or label, understand what you bring to the table, and ultimately why they should be interested in working with you.

 

The EPK is your calling card, one of the key items in your promotional weaponry and a must have package these days for anyone wanting to be taken seriously in the music industry.

 

What should be included in an electronic press kit?

 

Your electronic press kit should always contain your biography and details about releases you’ve had, places you’ve DJ’d. Or whatever it is you’re promoting to people. It can also include press photos, videos, upcoming tour dates listings, booking information, contact details and any other marketing information.

 

Some key points to consider: decide what the goal of creating your EPK is - get bookings, get on a label, get press coverage etc.

 

How to structure your EPK

 

Biography

Write the content for the audience. For example - press may want to just copy and paste your biography into their feature, so writing it in the third person helps help, whereas if you’re trying to build a relationship for a residency or label deal then writing as if you’re speaking may be a better tactic.

 

Contact information

Make it as easy as possible for someone to contact you. Email, telephone number, WhatsApp info - whatever you can, the goal is to get them to contact you so help them do that.

 

Photography

This in itself is a huge topic. Essentially you need images that are professional, represent you and can be used in a lot of different ways. IF a website uses wide images, you’ll need landscape shots, whereas social media tends to be rectangle or square images - so have a range of images available in hi resolution too. I personally have a link out of my EPK PDF that takes people to a Dropbox folder with everything they might need in there - meaning people don’t have to download a massive file to get what they want.

 

Avoid cliches - DJ’s with headphones round their necks (really?) or carrying equipment (why?). Check out some of your peers or people you follow and respect and see how they’re doing it.

 

Social Links

These days people have so many - choose your most impactful social media platforms - probably the one’s where people can hear your sounds and make it clear what is what - not just a long list. Make it look well designed.

 

Website

If you have a website - get people to it - it’s a chance to tell a longer story and these days is a crucial part of your personal brand.

Booking info

Whether you have an agent or do all that yourself be upfront about things. Tell people where you’ve played or where you are booked in the coming months. When I was researching the interview with Rissa Garcia I downloaded her EPK and the last page was just her bookings for the coming months - it made a big impression - she’s busy, she must be great… it spoke volumes about her so make sure people know when and where you’re playing.

 

Releases

If you’re a producer, then I probably don’t need a full discography, but a best of list of releases or just the most recent few would be enough - maybe you’ve charted on one of the retail stores chart - if so include the info - it all helps show you are a successful producer and someone they should pay attention to.

 

How much does an electronic press kit cost?

 

It doesn’t have to cost you anything, call on mates, blag a good camera, make it yourself and you’ll keep the costs to a minimum or better still free. Google lists the costs as between $700 and $5,000 if you’re getting a designer in on things!!! If you want a designer get in touch, I’ll do it for way less than that - ha!

 

What to do with your EPK?

 

Now you have all the right stuff in your EPK, make sure you keep it up to date, spell check it, get someone else to read it for you too and then get it out there. A link on your website is a great place to put it. And, if you’re about to fire it out to everyone you have on your list, remember to take as much care over the email you’re sending as the EPK itself - you only get one chance to make a first impression, so make it count.